Saturday, August 01, 2009

"White in White on White" - SOLD



Click Here to Bid

I enjoy these mostly tonal peices once in a while. They're challenging to say the least. There are 2 things one must always remember when paintings white: One is to always leave room in the value scale for the highlight (that's the ONLY pure white bit in the whole thing). Two, everything else is gray. To mix gray, I use blue, red, yellow and white (any). I prefer to mix my grays as opposed to using black and white or paynes gray or something like that, as I can get more variation my way, without even having to think about it.

9 comments:

Michael Naples said...

interesting. Im always interested in how other people mix gray. I personally have been mixing grays the same way for 10 years now. Just ultramarine blue and burnt sienna (of course with white). I vary those grays up with some cerulean blue or yellow ochre to push warm or coolness. It works wonders for me.

Mark Bridges said...

This is beautiful. Looks like a modern day Romio, waiting on his Juliet.

Stacey S. Hill said...

I find this painting very interesting. Love reading how you ( and Michael above ) mix grays... I learned a lot!

Bridget Rose Shanahan said...

Its nice to see the warm grays peeping through and the cool grays on top. I like to experiment with my grays I feel that when you mix with black it darkens the painting too much. Do you paint with oils indoors? I live on the 3rd story in an apartment building and only have a small balcony. I would like to use the oils more than when I just go on location, would opening the window with a fan be enough?

ginnyntex said...

I keep repeating your mantra from the San Antonio workshop--"a little bit of red....a little bit of blue...a little bit of yellow..." as I'm trying to make gray. Makes me smile. The workshop was so much fun! Virginia Floyd

Carolina said...

This piece is a great surprise...

Cindy Swindell said...

beautiful work Carol :-)

James said...

Mixing grey - interesting indeed. For watercolours I've used ultramarine and burnt sienna too and I've done this also with oil pastels and it works when you mix it with white / blue or ochre like Mr. Naples.

What about the dark side of a tomato though - that's still eluding me ...

David Lobenberg said...

Very nice with the warm orangeish under coat poking (peeking) through.