Sunday, August 02, 2009

"Yearly Checkup" - SOLD



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Sometimes my paintings fall into place like they were meant to be. This is one. I love it.

I got a question today about ventilation for oil paints. Let me preface my answer by exclaiming emphatically that I am NO expert! Bridget Rose wonders if "opening the window with a fan [is] enough?" My understanding is that yes, this is enough, of course in addition to not eating your paint or letting any of it sit on your skin for very long. One option is to wear gloves. Unfortunately for me my hands feel like they are suffocating under gloves, so I just keep a container of wet wipes (the kind for babies are best, and the Costco/Kirkland brand is primo) on hand at all times to wipe away the offending pigment.

There are also more and less dangerous pigments, and if you can find alternatives that work for you, great! You can also use Walnut Oil in place of turp/mineral spirits (I personally couldn't get used to the difference). If anyone has something to add, please comment or email me - I'd love to hear it.

16 comments:

David Westerfield said...

Really nice, Carol! I love the variety of edges.

Michael King said...

Use walnut oil instead of turps to clean your brushes and there is no need for heavy ventilation.

Marilyn said...

Stunning...also enjoyed the richness of your color selection in your 'A Cup'a Tomatoes' a few days back.

Don Coker said...

Carol, I love the color juxtaposition in this piece! Nice work, dear.

www.doncokerart.com/blog

Gary said...

Hi Carol,
I have used acrylic paint over many years, here in the UK but now I am using Winsor & Newton 'ARTISAN - water soluable oils. It has been for me like a rebirth, now being able to do all things that were denied me using acrylics. At Uni. I used trad. oil paints but due to my asthma it was a struggle. Now, working in a studio 3foot x 3foot I can once again use oils ...and clean up in less than 2 minutes, under the tap. I LOVE IT!!
www.hiscott.blogspot.com

Shirley Peters said...

I love this painting, Carol. I have recently tried tomatoes, and mine looked so flat... I can be inspired to try again after seeing your vibrant colours here.

At the art school I attend, turpentine is banned. Also, fixative.
So we have to use Odourless Solvent (instead of turps) and Liquin as a universal medium. And hairspray is a good alternative to fixative for drawings.

David Morris said...

Winsor and Newton "Sansodor" in the UK

Loved the painting.
David Morris

Kelley Carey MacDonald said...

Oh, yes, Carol, you knocked this one RIGHT out of the park! The tomato seems translucent in the light, with your skillful use of the reds (I could see at least 3). It made my day!

Last Cup Of Coffee said...

this is absolutely beautiful!!!!

nevin said...

I like the way you keep your own style.. Beautiful paintings..

James said...

Ha! I blew up (enlarged) your tomatoes and viewed it with Kolorpaint, a Linux variant of MSPaint. I can see you have used green in your tomatoes! Am I right?

To get the deeper shadows on the tomato you've progressively used more blue mixed in with the red - is that right??

Your picture is shrunk down small on my desktop now and looks very distant. The two tomatoes certainly look translucent which contrast nicely with the leftmost one in shadow.

I hate tomatoes but these are great.

ski holm said...

I clean my hands so often when I teach that my students think I have OCD. I use a Mechanics' hand cleaner. Goop or any equivalent. It comes in large pump containers for the studio and small tubes for painting outdoors. And like peanut butter, it comes in smooth and crunchy (with or without pumice).

The painting is a really wonderful observation.

Marla said...

I've been using plain old cheap vegetable oil to clean my brushes, followed by soap and water as needed, and then resorting to turpentine only when the brushes seem to be getting stiff.

I've just invested some $ in regular oil paints, but when I start to get low I may look into the water-soluble oils. Does anyone have an opinion about how they paint compared to regular oils?

J Nocifora said...

Carol, a really awesome painting. As to the topic of ventilation...I work in a very small space with oils. I keep two small fans going and I although I struggled at first with them, I always wear gloves. I really like Walnut Oil, but always have some odorless turp. nearby and in a small jar with the lid sitting on it loosely. Even though it is odorless, it is my understanding that it still gives off fumes. I also pour out a small amount of Liquin, but I am using less and less of it.

Christie said...

Gorgeous tomatoes- look like our Creole's down here in New Orleans.
I am confused about Walnut oil. Someone told me they use it as a medium? Anyone have any experience with that usage?

Janet Hill said...

I'm likely a little late to join the discussion, but I use Turpenoid Natural which is a non-toxic, nonflammable oil paint cleaner made by Weber. It smells a little like oranges, but does the job really well.