Thursday, July 16, 2009

"Reflections in Red" - SOLD



Click Here to Bid

If you haven't heard of Robert Genn and his regular letters that muse on all things art, it is worth checking out. It's called Painter's Keys, and you can sign up to get the newsletter, which is always very interesting. A few months ago he wrote about post show depression. I thought "not for me - it'll never happen." He said it has nothing to do with how many sales you make, and that every artist gets it. Well, I hate to say it but ... I have it. Not depression, more like a kind of directionless coasting. I'm sure I'll get a foothold on something soon, but for now ... I admit I'm spending more time outside working on the new studio than inside my temporary one.

24 comments:

Mark Bridges said...

Kind of like the "prom" is over and school's out ? Stay rested up though.

Rebecca said...

I've gotten it after all the hype was over. Sort of a "what now?" feeling. You probably need the break, enjoy doing something different.

I absolutely love your paintings in the show. Beautiful work, as always. You are one of 3 artists who inspire me on a regular basis!

Barbara Pask said...

I think it is a great motivator when we have a goal, keeps us painting. You deserve some down time, try to enjoy it.

Rusty Jones said...

Usually when the utility bill arrives it has the magical power to snap you back into reality. Otherwise, enjoy the post-show euphoria for as long as possible. Show looks great.

tracywall said...

I know, it's sort of anti-climactic. Little bit of unfocused "now what am I supposed to do" blues. What if you tried something completely different?

tracywall said...

PS: love those reflections on the bowl, btw!

Shirley Peters said...

It happened to me with my first group show in February.
Maybe getting a date for the next show might give you a pick up?
(I didn't sell anything... and I had to bring all the paintings home. I thought that was the cause of my "down".)

Hill Country House Girl said...

Carol - I get Robert Genn's letters and love reading them. I am spending a lot of time alone for a few weeks and just about the time I began feeling lonely, his essay titled "Feeling lonely this morning?"arrived. If you read it, you know it addresses the time artists spend alone and how that is when our creativity flows - anyway, it gave me great perspective and appreciation of my solitude. I'll bet your mood is perfectly normal and you will be back in the saddle again before you know it! Still lovin' your work!

Bobbi Heath said...

I think anticipation is such a big part of these things, so it makes sense to feel kind of flat when it's over. In a demo I went to by Arnold Desmarais, he recommended trying something totally different after finishing up for a show. The idea is to get out of your comfort zone, away from the pressure to perform/produce and just let go. And then bring back what you learn.

Laurel Daniel said...

This feeling makes total sense given the push to reach your goals for the show, and you should just "go" with it. Use the energy (and time) to get your studio done, organize the mundane, make appointments you have been putting off, get with old friends... Your creative spirit just needs and deserves a little break. It will roar back up again before you know it.

Mary Bullock said...

It is a weird feeling, isn't it.

David Westerfield said...

I know you had a great show, and you'll have more. Take a break, work on your studio and look at the art of those who inspire you.

Also, "Reflections in Red" is another nice painting.

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

Exactly.
It's like you put all your focus into the paintings for the show, and now what?
Temporary.
You are the slammin'-est painter! Enjoy building the studio, which is way exciting, too!

Marilyn said...

Balance is a wonderful thing.
Maybe you could think of it as finally having the time to focus on your n*e*w studio! Let your painting muse rest awhile.
It's all good!

Suzy Moritz-Rawdin said...

Carol, Robert Genn is one of my favorites. His newsletter is inspirational, just like your daily paintings. Relax a little! Your work continues to be top notch! Regards, Suzy

JMahorney said...

What a beauty! I love this set of colors together.

julie davis said...

Carol, your show looks fantastic. Your work and work ethic are entirely inspiring. Cut yourself some slack and enjoy the coasting; I'm sure you'll be back in there inspired and as prolific as ever very soon.

Kathy Hodge said...

I know that feeling exactly. The trouble is, mine lasts for months. I had a show in November and all the time I was preparing for it felt I couldn't wait to tackle some of the other painting ideas I had. But now that the show is over, I'm having trouble focusing.

Painting thought is still going on in my head though, and I know something will click soon. In the meantime, like others have said, it's a great time to organize, clean and catch up with your social life!

coral may said...

I think we artists forget how much focus and drive it takes to put a show togeather and that the "down" time is an essential part of the process. I've been enjoying your blog for some time now and want to take a workshop..someday!.

Karen's blog said...

I just got home from viewing your show. WOW! What a success. Your work truly is inspiring. I can't wait to set up a still life and "get loose", or at least try to do some softer edges.
I love the way you tone your canvas with wonderful colors that come through. What kind of canvas board do you paint on? Do you do your own, or buy a ready made board? Great show.

Chris said...

Good Lord Girl-with all that you do-daily paintings which so many of us absolutely love, a show which was stunning, a small child, undergoing construction and hormones. You need a delicious margarita and a hug. No worries, you'll be fine. I would love to see more plein air work by you-maybe you could wander around your yard and whip off a few fabulous outdoor paintings. Weren't you and your husband thinking about taking a journey to a national park this summer? Maybe now is the time. I'm heading for Robert Genn land-glorious Canada.

Carol Horzempa said...

Carol, I'm a senior citizen and remember years ago how I had to take time off every so often while raising a family. I was really frustrated at the time thinking I would forget how to paint. I even went for a year without painting but it didn't take long for me to get back what I lost. I'm still learning at my old age and love it!

I agree with Chris...I bet if you even shut the door to your studio and took a break for a while you would come back refreshed with renewed energy. You will never lose your painting muscles!

Beth said...

I agree!! I knew a friend who was a medal winner in the equestrian olympics. She experienced something similar when it was over..."now what??"
You have preformed in your own olympics...and in my opinion, WON THE GOLD!!
I saw the show via computer, but it was gorgeous!! Your name in the window gave me goosebumps!!

Carol Marine said...

Thank you all for the wonderful support and encouragement!

Karen's blog, I use Raymar panels that come complete and ready to go. They are reasonably priced and archival too. I highly recommend them.