Thursday, July 05, 2012

Tools of the Trade


Click Here to Bid

First of all, I posted the wrong link for the frames yesterday, sorry about that. It should be www.frankenframes.com (Franken with an "e"). Second, the specific frame style I posted pictures of was #2026. And lastly, several of you asked how I attach my panels to the floating frames. Well ... I haven't actually done this yet. In the photos the paintings are just sitting in there, unattached. I just ordered some black foamboard from Dick Blick and plan to cut pieces of that, slightly smaller than the paintings, and then use silicone adhesive to glue the panel to the foamboard, and the foamboard to the frame. That's the plan anyway.

15 comments:

Annelotte Fellinger said...

Just a little tip, we use a lot of foamboard at school for presentations and such. It warps very easily over time, even the thicker stuff!
At the framer over here they glue the canvas to hardboard/masonite and put that in the frame. You can use 4 little pieces of hardboard at the backside to get the painting level with the frame.

adebanji said...

Always love when you do the painting materials.

Sharon Whitley said...

fab painting - love paintings of everyday objects - just shows that anything can be a subject to paint and can be made into a work of art!

Linda Nickles said...

I have recently been using Franken frames, and think they're great. Their staff is very helpful and friendly, and I like their prices. I would definitely recommend them. Carol, I like your idea of using black foamboard to attach the paintings to. Brilliant!

Madelaine said...

Hi Carol,
Have you checked out using canvas framing offsets? I use those to attach my canvas and hardwood to floater frames. They work awesome!

You can see an example of them here:
https://store.opusartsupplies.com/sagro/storefront/store.php?mode=browsecategory&category=3223

Cheers!!

Brenda Behr said...

Carol, So glad you've plugged Franken Frames. They offer an awesome selection of frames and exceptional service. Two years ago they framed an entire show for me in one of their floater frames. Roger (at Franken) gave me step-by-step directions for using their floaters. Just this week I ordered free samples of several styles. Check out #3459. Love it!

Barbara Pask said...

Really like this one. Like how you ran the brush off the top and the palette knife off the bottom.

Denise said...

Lovely painting as always. Off topic, but only a bit. If I were going to buy a new plein air set up to travel out of the country what would you recommend?

Carol Marine said...

Hey all - thanks so much for the wonderful comments!!!

Denise, I would recommend checking out Open Box M or Art Box and Panel Co for a new plein air setup. They both have great features. I personally prefer the latter, but they are both good systems. Have a wonderful trip!

Michelle Arnold Paine said...

The canvas offsets work great in floater frames... if the paintings are on canvas!! Silicon should work well if the paintings are on hardboard -- building up with gatorboard or with hardboard should work fine to get the painting level with the frame.

I usually make my own floater frames and just screw the frame directly into the stretcher bars.

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

Also, one of my favorite subjects.
Thanks for all the tips on floater frames.
Once you start using them you really can't go back and I always paint right out to the edges despite my intention no to :)

Denise said...

Thanks Carol. Can you elaborate just a bit on what you like better about the art box and panel plein aire set-up? The two you list are the ones I've been considering.

Carol Marine said...

Denise- Yes, absolutely. The Open Box M is more compact, especially if you just order the inside part, which is what I did. That part is particularly attractive for international travel. The Art Box has the side parts that flip out, which you can use as extra mixing room, or to put stuff like turps and whatnot. The latter is what I do, and that's why I use this one over the Open Box M. I have taken both to paint in Germany. Both worked just fine.

Kathleen said...

Thank you so much Carol for all your generous advise and help! I love the floating frames and have been using them for a while now. Franken has a newer website specifically for the floaters: http://www.dailypaintersframes.com. I find silicone works well to attach panels permanently and you can use hardboard for a spacer if you want to raise the height. But the best tip I have is to put 4 small dots of velcro in the frame and on each panel for a temporary fix. I made a little template so the position of the tabs is always consistent. I can then pop paintings in and out of frames, interchange them, display at shows or festivals, keep a revolving display in my home and still change the frames around as needed. Then if I sell a piece unframed, I just peel the velcro off. If I sell a piece with a frame my customer can select which frame they want, then I peel off all velcro and silicone it in. I always buy the frames that are sized to allow about 1/8" space all the way around the painting so you can easily get a hold of the edge of the painting to remove it. Also, I have found using velcro is great on my easel too so now every panel gets the 4 tabs of velcro which stay on it through painting until sold. If you use the soft velcro half on the panels and the looped half on the frames you will find the little tabs on the backs of all panels make a nice "cushion" so dry paintings can be safely stacked for storage. Of course, Carol, you sell all of yours, but some of us have stacks in our studios. :)

Karen Desnick said...

Carol,
We have done a couple of videos on attaching floater frames to canvases:
http://www.metroframe.com/wood-floater-frames-installing-the-painting/

and panels:
http://www.metroframe.com/attaching-paintings-to-panel-frames/

That you and your readers might find helpful.

All the best!

http://www.metroframe.com/