Tuesday, July 03, 2012

High Stack


Click Here to Bid - 4x8 inches

This is another cut up section of ... what I thought was gessoed masonite, but is actually gessoed hardboard. I got a couple of suggestions for making the surface better. One was mixing in marble dust and the other was oil based gesso. Have any of you tried either of these? Does the marble dust gesso make a surface similar to Ampersand gessobord? I would love that.

17 comments:

Shelby Dillon said...

I think if you want a super smooth, slick surface, you're going to have to do a lot of sanding in between coats. Some artists I know do 2-3 coats and use a fine grit sander to get rid of the ridges. But, like I said before, I just get some larger pieces of the gessoboard (like if I want some 4x8 ones, then I'll get several 8x8) and cut them to the sizes I want. The edges are fine and you still have that nice slick surface!

Mari Jose Molina said...

i love it, the composition and the colors are nice!

yvonne said...

When I gesso my own boards I use one of those cheap foam rollers after the gesso has been applied. I roll it over the surface - not pressing, just letting the weight of the roller make a nice even texture. If I don't want an absorbent surface I coat it with liquin. If you want a toned surface you can tint the gesso or the liquin.

Shinhuey Ho said...

I have not used Gessobord so can't say if it's the same. Mine feels like a rougher surface than Ampersand's pasteboard. If you don't want the brushstroke to show, use a paint roller.

Erica Keener said...

Carole, sometimes I use pastel primer on my surfaces when I paint. The marble dust or pumice is mixed right in and creates a lightly sanded texture. I don't know if that is what you are going for, but you might find it interesting to play with. Art Spectrum's primer is my personal preference.

Anita Tresslar said...

Carol, I learned in art school to use bullseye shillac on board and I love the surface. It is a very smooth, slick surface. It doesn't grab the paint like gesso. Personally I like a slicker surface than I get with gesso.

Kevin said...

I haven't tried the Marble dust, but oil based primer (I like the one from Windsor and Newton) will make the surface smooth and not thirsty. Maybe to get that pebbled texture do the top layer of primer with a roller?

Sharon Lynn Williams said...

Hi Carol: I got a formula from Marc Hanson that has 1/2c gesso, 1/2c light molding paste (Golden) and a teaspoon of marble dust. It makes an absorbent, roughish surface that is very nice and holds a stroke well. You could eliminate the marble dust if you wanted a smoother surface.
Sharon

Donna C Farrell said...

Hi Carol,
The suggestion of marble dust is good. Another product you might want to explore is Liquitex Clear Acrylic Gesso. It dries somewhat transparent, so you could mix in some white gesso with it, but it has a tooth similar to pumice or marble dust.

Sharon Lynn Williams said...

Hi Carol: I have used Gamblin's oil ground and I love it. It grips the paint better than acrylic gesso and doesn't stain when you wipe it back. I have also used a formula that I got from Marc Hanson in which you combine 1/2c gesso, 1/2 cup light molding paste (Goldens) and 1 tsp marble dust. I like a smoother surface, so I would eliminate the marble dust, but the molding paste mixed with the gesso makes a nice absorbant surface with more drag than pure acrylic gesso.
Hope this helps!
Sharon

Anonymous said...

I use a recipe that Marc Hanson suggested somewhere on the internet a while back: Acrylic gesso plus marble dust (or fine pumice stone or Gamblin's "whiting" ) and then when that's dry sealing with a 1/2 cut mixture of shellac (shellac is cut with denatured alcohol 1:1). The shellac makes it feel a little more like lead primed which I like -- but may be too slippery for you with your medium choice.

I also like Gamblin's oil prime which I apply with a roller that leaves a slight, but even texture.

I also like the long aspect ratio --besides 2:1 you might try 1.77:1 and 1.85:1

--Dan

Stephanie Berry said...

I used to gesso masonite and mdf but now the only mdf panels one can buy are 1/4" thick so they're too heavy. Decided it's easier to buy canvases or RayMar. I was wondering the other day if you're doing any large works like ones you've had in galleries? Like your stack and your "Duck-Goose-Duck". Great colors.

Mary Lou Epperson said...

If you use a foam roller over the last coat of an acrylic gesso you'll most nearly approximate an Ampersand surface. You can also throw in a small amount of marble dust to get a little more tooth, might be more tooth than you're used to.

Shane Davis said...

I always enjoy paintings with a simple subject, where the composition takes center stage. Really effective painting here. Thanks for sharing it.

helen said...

I have some mugs like that.

Dalan said...

Surprised no one has mentioned this yet but try the krylon spray gesso. I have used it right on lightweight gatorboard and two coats makes a very similar surface to the ampersand gesso boards. It looks more matte but is not too absorbent.

Cathleen Rehfeld said...

oooh LOVE this one! the colors, composition, everything!