Tuesday, September 28, 2010

"Don't Lose Your Head"


After yesterday's post I got a couple of comments suggestiong the onion didn't look so much like an onion. Yikes! But hey, I can take some good honest criticism ... I'm good. The nice thing about this format is ... you can't see me cry. : ) This is my third attempt. A little more oniony?

31 comments:

Layne Cook said...

Unmistakenly onions. Nice job! We learn more from criticism than from praise...

Bobbi Heath said...

You've got it Carol, these guys are really onion-y. They're making me cry! Love that slice off the top, and the raggedy end on the uncut onion.

Allison said...

These are great! And, yes... onions are HARD!

Sandra Galda said...

Really goregeous onions. I could just keep lookin at them. Great painting, Carol. In real life, if I looked at cut onions that long, my eyes would water.

Wait...is this a tear ??? :)

Kelley Carey MacDonald said...

NICE and onion-y! Yup, onions are HARD! They don't have the translucence of a lot of fruit and veggies, but they DO have kind of a glow! I like how you sliced the top of of one..... Is THAT why you're really crying?????

Michael Chamberlain said...

I just painted a pepper that looks like a cross between a strawberry and a macintosh/fuji/grannysmith apple. And I thought peppers were supposed to be easy!! I'd say you really nailed it. No doubt about it, you painted ONIONS!!!

Anonymous said...

Yes those are onions all right. I can smell them from here. How about a few more and tell us what you learned from this experiment.

Christine said...

Onions are suppose to make you cry, that is their job! My friend who follows your posts (and is an excellent painter and teacher) said she love your work because you are always learning and the growth is so evident..you will soon be the master of onions and then the rest of us will have the courage to take the challenge.

Pamela Nichols said...

These do look like onions. Helen Van Wyk (via DVD) taught me to paint onions like you would paint hair. Put a big highlight blob one way, then affect it the other way. I haven't painted onions lately, but the technique helped my latest portrait. I do find myself holding my breath until the blob of paint becomes hair or onion...

Penelope Lentz said...

Beautiful painting, Carol! sniff sniff.

nobody said...

Yes! Much better.

Ulrike Miesen-Schürmann said...

Hello Carol,

yes, the tiny stripes on the headless onion makes it an onion. I'm sure some of them on the surface would be even more oniony O:-)

Ulrike

Anonymous said...

They look like onions to me! I think we're used to seeing oranges, apples, and pears as more frequent subjects for painting; and onions have some fine scale details that help convey onion-ness. What really impresses me is how you capture onion-ness with your loose, broad brushwork (which I love), *without* needing to get all fiddly with the details. I am always impressed with a painter who can convey a subject with less, rather than more, and you do this beautifully. (Your colors, value, and form nail it, leaving the painting to feel spontaneous and alive and free from overworking. P.S. I am a beginning painter who gets way too caught up in the fiddling with the details. Keep it up!)

Theresa Bayer said...

This is way better. You got that thin skinned look of an onion while maintaining your "thick artist skin" that can benefit from criticism. You've won on both counts!

Anonymous said...

Carol, No they still are not onions, only brown things. The cut helps but you do seem to try to "get away with" sometimes. See http://www.ket.org/muse/currier/currier_gallery.htm
-work by Mary Ann Currier. Yes you are good but be careful to not get too "stylish" with your angular brush strokes - your landscapes have progressed a lot. Keep on truckin:
Edward Powell
powec@pitt.edu

Mary Bullock said...

Oh Onions are soooooo hard - I think because they are made up of layers and layers of thin paper-like things and not a solid one layer shiny surface. But you have truly accomplished painting an onion! Great job!

DIANE TASSELMYER said...

I have looked at all the onion paintings so far and there is only one thing missing....this will make it a perfect onion.
Put a few lines (like longitude lines)
they are a defining characteristic of an onion. just a few of thise lines.

Martha Cowan said...

Definitely onions - the way the one on the left is cut and the color inside tells us for sure.

Julie in the studio said...

You nailed it!

bricarwaller said...

Looks terrific! I bet you'll pick a less odoriferous subject next:)

Christopher Greco said...

Beautiful work, as in most things, each effort surpasses the previous.

Ed, can we take a look at your efforts?

Roxanne said...

Carol, even though I love to paint and have a lot to learn, I have to throw in my 'bossy butt/ first botn' opinion and say, I think these onions are very good! I love your brush strokes, eye for colors and careful use of both. After reading Edward Powell's comment I checked out Mary Ann Currier's onions, which are lovely and realistic. But it is your style and interpretation that sends me over the edge and off to the studio in persuit of excellence!...or what is excellent to me! So, with respect I disagree with Mr. Powell and say, 'Yes, Carol! They are definitely onions with wonderful, brown papery skins! Your daily practice has made them perfect! Which reminds me I need to go paint, so I can get better too! Thanks for modeling disciplince and determination, and beautifully displaying the results.

DSM said...

What are onion traits: you cut them and reveal concentic rings. This painting addresses both, and the knife brings in nice value contrasts. Hmmm.... flaking onion skin?

Rose Baggs said...

Totally agree with Roxanne. Carol, your style and all the emotion that you capture in your paintings are what makes so many people to look for your workshops. I do like realistic paintings but the impressionistic ones are the ones that turn me on. Your work is wonderful. You're talented and so willing to teaching and pass on your knowledge to people. This makes you very special. Your Onions are pure joy. Keep them coming!!!

Anonymous said...

Bamb!!

Crystal Cook said...

I've liked all your onions. Very, very onion-y. I do like how you've cut this one. Very cool :)

So. . . Are you an onion yet? ;)

And I second what Roxanne and Rose said. I was just telling my husband the other day (now don't take offense to this, cuz I'm like totally your biggest fangirl *popsbubblegum*) that I didn't see the appeal in painting a still life of fruits and vegetables (I paint portraits) if you were just going to do a strict representation of the fruits and vegetables.

And that right there is what I LOVE about your paintings. It's YOUR style that draws me and everyone else to your work. It's beautiful and energetic and filled with skill and finesse. Your brushstrokes and interpretation is what appeals to me the most. Because without all that, it would be. . . an onion. Yawn.

Well, I think I've said more than enough. Paint on!

Anonymous said...

Ok... let be the one to ask... Who the hell is this Edward Powell guy?! What a total ass. He's entitled to his opinions of course, but it's embarrassing how out of touch he is. Too many years of pontificating at the university I suppose. His pomposity is hilarious.

Miguel

Kristen said...

I like this onion the best out of the three. Posting the attempts and encouraging honest comments and debate makes your blog better I think.

Anonymous said...

love the blob of yellow on the cut onion,and the shadow on the sliced off onion,and the shadow on the knife ,and o o o,the brush stroke for the ground those onions are sitting on..wow.

Anonymous said...

lol people who can't tell any of these paintings are onions are crazy. I could see the onion right away, even in the first painting. Don't listen to that Edward guy, because your stylish angular brushstrokes are what I love so much about your paintings! I only wish I could paint like you, I get so obsessed with the details... it would be a dream to take your workshop someday...

Sharon Schock said...

I just cut up an onion tonight, I remembered your painting and it made me enjoy it a little more...that Edward guy is a tool.