Tuesday, December 22, 2009

"Kiwi Breakfast" - SOLD


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I am always trying to strike a balance between loose & still recognizable. I feel I've gotten just a little fiddly lately so with this one I deliberately tried to stay very loose with my strokes, still being very deliberate with each one.

11 comments:

Terry Rafferty said...

You've succeeded brilliantly with this one - the Kiwi are perfection, and that one highlight on the plate makes the whole painting sing.

silentwitness said...

What a fantastic composition and color scheme. Wonderful painting, with a bit of mystery!

Your studio (earlier post) exterior looks great. So very sorry to read about your husband's Dad--will keep you all in our prayers.

Christopher O'Handley said...

Success! Very effective. One of these days I'm going to learn to put down a stroke and then leave it alone. It really does require discipline...

ski holm said...

Very Manet like. A nice economy of brush strokes. Well done.

Kerri Settle said...

This is so eye-catching; I think I love every stroke!

Jen said...

Carol - I'm glad to see you have chosen some darker images lately, darker shadows, etc. I like these very much. Your canvas - do you use stretched or canvas panels? Jen

Sally Shisler......... said...

This piece is amazing Carol. If I put out a painting like this, I'd think I'd died and gone to heaven!

Yesterday's kicks butt too. I'm sayin' again girl - you WILL be in the art history books. No doubt in my mind!

C. k. Agathocleous said...

"I am always trying to strike a balance between loose & still recognizable."

You won. I actually sucked in my breathe when I saw this one.

clyde semler said...

The warm ground peeking through those buttery neutral grays really whets my appetite. With broken strokes you've created a lot of overlapping planes, giving much space within the compressed format.
Never have thought of you as particularly fiddly, but think you're right on here with the active brushwork. Good job!

Happy Holidays!

DSM said...

These colors are spot-on; me likey, Filbert.

I have a little book in my studio: on nothing but color combinations. Its audience is surface designers (fabric/wallpaper, etc.) and the inclusion of 'black' (the darkest value gray) ups the sophistication of a design. I notice a buzz here when you employ more dark values; but then maybe I see what I look for.....

I haven't any kiwis but I COULD do a painting of holiday leftovers.

Von said...

My new desktop backround :D